Book List: Magnets

Magnet Max by Monica Lozano Hughes

Magnet Max (Learning League)

Atoms by S. Taylor Williams

Magnets Push, Magnets Pull by David A. Adler

I am Albert Einstein by Brad Meltzer

Extreme Laboratories by Anne O. Squire

Infinity and Me by Kate Hosford

Mezmerized by Mara Rockliff

The New Way Things Work by David Macaulay

Toys by Don Wulffson

The Shivers in the Fridge by Fran Manushkin

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2019 Lesson: Magnets

Magnets are all around us from our computers, compasses, phones, cars and our amazing Earth.

“From your clothes to your desk, every bit of matter is made of tiny particles called atoms. Atoms have negatively charged electrons that spin around them. Most of the time, the electrons spin in random directions. When the electrons all spin in the same direction, though, they create an invisible force known as magnetism.

When something is magnetic, it can pull things with steel or iron in them to it. The two ends of a magnet are called the north and south poles. These are the parts where the magnets are strongest. Around these poles is an area known as a magnetic field. In the magnetic field, other objects can be drawn to the magnet.” ~easyscienceforkids.com

In class we will be having magnetic stations, magnet marble races, making magnetic slime, making homemade compasses and extracting the iron out of cereal with  a magnet. I’m excited to “attract” the kids to science…haha!

Book list: Circuits

How Ben Franklin Stole the Lightning by Rosalyn SchanzerSee the source image

Electrical Wizard by Elizabeth Rusch

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If by David J. Smith

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The Magic School Bus and the Electric Fieldtrip by Joanna Cole

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Oscar and the Bird by Geoff Waring

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Electricity for Kids:Facts, Photos and Fun by Baby Professor

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Girls think of Everything by Catherine Thimmesh

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Now and Ben by Gene Barretta

 

2019 Lesson: Circuits & electricity

See the source image

I’m pretty pumped to teaching kids about circuits and electricity. I will demonstrate a simple circuit, show how the Wimhurst machine works and show a plasma ball. In class we will be building simple circuits, more advanced circuits, playing with snap circuits, building 3D Bohr atoms and building potato batteries.

Electricity is the flow of electrical power or charge. In order to understand how electric charge moves from one atom to another, we need to know something about atoms. Atoms are made of even smaller particles. The center of an atom is called the nucleus. It is made of particles called protons and neutrons. The protons and neutrons are very small, but electrons are much, much smaller. Electrons spin around the nucleus in shells a great distance from the nucleus. Electrons are held in their shells by an electrical force. The protons and electrons of an atom are attracted to each other. They both carry an electrical charge. An electrical charge is a force within the particle. Protons have a positive charge (+) and electrons have a negative charge (-). The positive charge of the protons is equal to the negative charge of the electrons. Opposite charges attract each other. ~https://www.kids.esdb.bg/electricity.html

Book List #3 Cause & effect/ Sink or float

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst

Alexander

Bartholomew and the Oobleck by Dr. Seuss

Bartholomew and the oobleck

Bubble, Bubble by Mercer Mayer

bubble bubble

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff

If you give a mouse a cookie

The Day Jimmy’s Boa Ate the Wash by Trinka Hakes Noble

The Day Jimmys Boa ate the wash

The Rain Came Down by David Shannon

The Rain came down

Where Once There Was a Wood by Denise Fleming

Where once there was a wood

Things That Float and Things That Don’t by David A. Adler

Things that float

2018 Lesson #4 Light, prisms, rainbow science & kaleidoscopes

Image result for how are rainbows formed

In this lesson we will be learning about PS3 A- Definitions of Energy, PS3 C- Relationship between energy and forces

In class we will be learning of refractions and light and how it is a form of energy. We will be experimenting with prisms, light and rainbows.

Light is made of tiny photons which contain lots of energy. … Light is also called electromagnetic radiation when speaking of light other than visible light. Of all the forms of radiation and light on the electromagnetic spectrum, humans can only visibly see a very small amount of light.

A rainbow is a meteorological phenomenon that is caused by reflection, refraction and dispersion of light in water droplets resulting in a spectrum of light appearing in the sky. It takes the form of a multi-colored circular arc. Rainbows caused by sunlight always appear in the section of sky directly opposite the sun.

2018 Lesson #3 Chemical reactions, oobleck & sink or float activities

Image result for oobleck

This lesson we will be learning about PS2 B Types of interactions, PS2 C Stability and instability in physical systems, PS1 B Chemical reactions.

In class we will be testing different items to see if they sink of float. We will be making oobleck (a non-newtonian fluid) and also experimenting with chemical reactions.

What is a chemical reaction? Think about baking a cake. Each ingredient has a job to do. Flour provides the structure; baking powder and baking soda give the cake its airiness; eggs bind the ingredients; butter and oil tenderize; sugar sweetens; and milk or water provides moisture.

Combining the dry and wet ingredients puts them to work — the proteins in the flour bond and create gluten, giving the cake its flexibility. Eggs hold the mixture together. Baking powder and baking soda each release carbon dioxide, adding bubbles to the batter, helping it expand (Chemical reaction). Baking is a science!

Physical changes result from a changing in the physical state of a substance. The physical change can be melting, evaporation, or boiling. For instance, ice melts into liquid water, and the liquid water can be turned into steam through boiling. The arrangement of the molecules making up the ice and water change into different states, but the molecules still remain water molecules during each change.

chemical change occurs as the result of a chemical reaction. During a chemical reaction, the atoms within a substance are rearranged into different combinations. For example, sugar undergoes a chemical change when it is cooked to make caramel. The heat from the cooking converts sugar molecules into different molecules that give caramel its color and flavor.

Several general types of chemical reactions can occur based on what happens when going from reactants to products. The more common types of chemical reactions are as follows:

  • Combination

  • Decomposition

  • Displacement

  • Combustion

  • Redox