Book List #4 Light and Rainbow Science

Day Light, Night Light by Frankly M Branley

Light- Day Light, Night Light

Elmer and the Rainbow by David McKee

Light- Elmer and the rainbow

The Magic School Bus Makes a Rainbow

Light- Magic School Bus

On a Beam of Light by Jennifer Berne

Light- On a Beam of Light

Planting a Rainbow by Lois Ehlert

Light- Planting a Rainbow

Rainbow Stew by Cathryn Falwell

Light- Rainbow Stew

Sound and Light by Karen Bryant-Mole

Light- Sound and Light

The Sun Is My Favorite Star by Frank Asch

Light- The sun is my favorite star

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Book List #3 Cause & effect/ Sink or float

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst

Alexander

Bartholomew and the Oobleck by Dr. Seuss

Bartholomew and the oobleck

Bubble, Bubble by Mercer Mayer

bubble bubble

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff

If you give a mouse a cookie

The Day Jimmy’s Boa Ate the Wash by Trinka Hakes Noble

The Day Jimmys Boa ate the wash

The Rain Came Down by David Shannon

The Rain came down

Where Once There Was a Wood by Denise Fleming

Where once there was a wood

Things That Float and Things That Don’t by David A. Adler

Things that float

2018 Lesson #4 Light, prisms, rainbow science & kaleidoscopes

Image result for how are rainbows formed

In this lesson we will be learning about PS3 A- Definitions of Energy, PS3 C- Relationship between energy and forces

In class we will be learning of refractions and light and how it is a form of energy. We will be experimenting with prisms, light and rainbows.

Light is made of tiny photons which contain lots of energy. … Light is also called electromagnetic radiation when speaking of light other than visible light. Of all the forms of radiation and light on the electromagnetic spectrum, humans can only visibly see a very small amount of light.

A rainbow is a meteorological phenomenon that is caused by reflection, refraction and dispersion of light in water droplets resulting in a spectrum of light appearing in the sky. It takes the form of a multi-colored circular arc. Rainbows caused by sunlight always appear in the section of sky directly opposite the sun.

2018 Lesson #3 Chemical reactions, oobleck & sink or float activities

Image result for oobleck

This lesson we will be learning about PS2 B Types of interactions, PS2 C Stability and instability in physical systems, PS1 B Chemical reactions.

In class we will be testing different items to see if they sink of float. We will be making oobleck (a non-newtonian fluid) and also experimenting with chemical reactions.

What is a chemical reaction? Think about baking a cake. Each ingredient has a job to do. Flour provides the structure; baking powder and baking soda give the cake its airiness; eggs bind the ingredients; butter and oil tenderize; sugar sweetens; and milk or water provides moisture.

Combining the dry and wet ingredients puts them to work — the proteins in the flour bond and create gluten, giving the cake its flexibility. Eggs hold the mixture together. Baking powder and baking soda each release carbon dioxide, adding bubbles to the batter, helping it expand (Chemical reaction). Baking is a science!

Physical changes result from a changing in the physical state of a substance. The physical change can be melting, evaporation, or boiling. For instance, ice melts into liquid water, and the liquid water can be turned into steam through boiling. The arrangement of the molecules making up the ice and water change into different states, but the molecules still remain water molecules during each change.

chemical change occurs as the result of a chemical reaction. During a chemical reaction, the atoms within a substance are rearranged into different combinations. For example, sugar undergoes a chemical change when it is cooked to make caramel. The heat from the cooking converts sugar molecules into different molecules that give caramel its color and flavor.

Several general types of chemical reactions can occur based on what happens when going from reactants to products. The more common types of chemical reactions are as follows:

  • Combination

  • Decomposition

  • Displacement

  • Combustion

  • Redox

2018 Lesson #2 Chemistry, measuring & density

chemistry-740453_1920

This lesson we will be learning about PS1A- Structure and properties of matter, PS!B- Chemical reactions. I want to familiarize students with different ways of measuring things in a lab.

We will use the triple beam balance and weights, different scales and volumes and learn different ways of how to measure things.  

We will learn about density and what makes some liquids more dense than others and test out our theories.

Density is a word we use to describe how much space an object or substance takes up (its volume) in relation to the amount of matter in that object or substance (its mass). Another way to put it is that density is the amount of mass per unit of volume. If an object is heavy and compact, it has a high density.”

Volume refers to the amount of space the object takes up. In other words, volume is a measure of the size of an object, just like height and width are ways to describe size. If the object is hollow (in other words, empty), volume is the amount of water it can hold.”

We will also build molecules with molecule kits

A molecule is the smallest unit of a substance that has all the properties of that substance. For instance, a water molecule is the smallest unit that is still water. A water molecule can be divided into tiny parts called atoms. This produces two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom.”

2018 Lesson #1 Vortex cannon & waves

4 domains of science

I am changing up how I am teaching science this year. I will be teaching the four domains of science according to the NGSS which are: Physical Science, Life Science, Earth & Space Science,  & Engineering/ Tech/ Applications of Science. We will be learning about all of these and how to use the cross- cutting concepts while doing experiments.

This lesson we will be learning about PS4 A: Waves and their applications in science and PS2: Motion and stability

In lab we will be making our own vortex cannons and learning what makes the air move, describing the characteristics of air and all of the different waves. We will look for patterns and also the structure and function of the vortex cannon.

An air vortex cannon works primarily by applying force quickly and efficiently to air molecules contained in a semi-enclosed space. When the stretchy balloon surface at the back of the cannon snaps forward, it collides directly with air molecules, accelerating them towards the opening of the cannon and setting off a chain reaction of high-speed collisions with other air molecules and the sides of the cannon’s barrel. The only way for all of these colliding high-speed air molecules to escape is out through the opening at the end of the barrel. The rapid escape of the air molecules forms a stream, or jet, of air that flows straight out of the cannon. Poof!

It’s going to be awesome! It’s about to get crazy in here. We are “blasting” into a new year full of science experiments- wahoo!!!

Science in the community- (Unit #3 Marie Curie)

STEAMFest_logo_1

Curie Bonus: Attend Steam Scream @ SUU Ballroom with your family

October 16th: 5:00-8:00 pm (Open to public during evening hours)

This is a great opportunity for the students to get hands on stem education at our very own Southern Utah University.

thunderbird

 

OR

Find one way you use chemistry in your everyday life. Ask your parent to help you figure out one way, (acid/base reactions, digestion, exercise, cooking, combustion, soaps, plants, elements in your body, etc.) experiment with adult supervision if needed and then tell me about it when you turn in your science in the community ticket.