Science in the community- (Unit #6 Edmond Locard)

We are learning all about forensic science in our science lab. This would be a great opportunity for your child to visit with a policeman/detective or the police station and find out all they do for our community. They could ask, “how does every contact leave a trace?” which is Edmond Locard’s famous quote.

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Science in the community- (Unit #5 Gregor Mendel)

We are learning about genetics this month in science. A great opportunity for your child would be to attend the movie Wonder at the movie theater. It is based on the book Wonder by R.J. Palacio and is fabulous. The protagonist was born with a genetic mutation called Treacher Collins Syndrome. Not only is it a great book, but it teaches lessons on choosing kindness and not bullying.

Another option if your child can’t see the movie, is to interview a grandparent and find out what similarities and differences your child has with their relative.

Fill out the science in the community ticket in my classroom, have your parent sign it and turn it into my science bird jar for a treat and a chance to get your name in for consideration for the Einstein Award.

So now go “BOND” over the movie/book Wonder haha! (Get it….bond!)

Science In The Community- (Unit #4 Galileo Galilei)

Ashcroft-Observatory-Entrance-SUUGalileo BONUS: Go visit the SUU Ashcroft observatory.

I have been here a couple times and it is awesome! In our unit on Galileo and astronomy, the students are learning all about the universe. This is the perfect spot to visit and observe the stars and planets.

Phone: (435) 586-1409

The Ashcroft Observatory is located on the hilltop just south of the SUU farm on Westview Drive.

OPEN NIGHTS

In keeping with a long-standing tradition stemming from its opening in the early 1970s, the Observatory remains focused on community involvement and learning opportunities. The Ashcroft Observatory is open every Monday night to all those interested in learning about constellations or viewing distant parts of the galaxy. Interested parties should plan on arriving at the observatory just as the sun sets. As weather or other conditions might alter this schedule, before driving out, please call the number above to make sure someone is there.

This is a free opportunity, and has been of great use in the past to school groups, scout groups and families, but all are welcome and encouraged to enjoy the splendor in the skies. ~SUU

So go blast off to the observatory. The sky is the limit!

Science in the community- (Unit #3 Marie Curie)

STEAMFest_logo_1

Curie Bonus: Attend Steam Scream @ SUU Ballroom with your family

October 16th: 5:00-8:00 pm (Open to public during evening hours)

This is a great opportunity for the students to get hands on stem education at our very own Southern Utah University.

thunderbird

 

OR

Find one way you use chemistry in your everyday life. Ask your parent to help you figure out one way, (acid/base reactions, digestion, exercise, cooking, combustion, soaps, plants, elements in your body, etc.) experiment with adult supervision if needed and then tell me about it when you turn in your science in the community ticket.

Science in the community-(Unit #2 Isaac Newton)

Newton BONUS: Visit the Aquatic Center or a local park and find somewhere that uses Newton’s laws of motion.

cedar city park

The students are learning all about Newton’s laws of motion and gravity, and also about mass and weight. Mass is how much matter is in an object. Weight is how much gravity is pulling on an object. Gravity pulls harder on the thing that has the greatest mass (or is the heaviest). They will be using all of this information when building their angry birds marshmallow catapults and roller coasters. Have fun making a splash and diving into physics!!

Science in the community- (Unit #1 Albert Einstein & Physics )

EINSTEIN BONUS: Go Geo-caching around Cedar City.

In our unit on Einstein and relativity, we are learning how modern day GPS uses the theory of relativity because gravity curves space and time which results in orbiting clocks ticking slightly faster on Earth.

“General relativity predicts that time will appear to run slow under stronger gravitational pull which means the clocks on board the satellites will therefore seem to run faster than a clock on Earth. Furthermore, special relativity predicts that because the satellites’ clocks are moving relative to a clock on Earth, they will appear to run slower. The whole GPS network has to make allowances for these effects.” ~Physics.org

Yay for cool science! So go with your family and teach them about all you are learning in class.

You can learn more about it hereĀ GPS & Relativitynavigation-1048294_1920